DTS BLOG: Konnichiwa and Sayonara (EN/NL)

ENGLISH

My DTS season is over. I finished graduation and I can honestly say that it has been such an amazing, wild ride. I feel blessed knowing that I’ve made the choice of doing a DTS, which changed my life forever for the better.

I first want to take this moment to just take you guys back with me on my beautiful outreach. I may post a seperate blogpost about the spiritual journey of Japan, which was the most insane experience ever, so I will keep that part short for now.
The outreach has been a wild ride, in which we had the opportunity to serve in Tokyo at the Little Ones’ Mission Nihonbashi Church (yea it’s a long name don’t ask me why) and in Osaka at YWAM Osaka (Blessing Church International (BCI)). We served by doing children’s ministry and adult ministry, in which we mainly taught English. Besides this we had the opportunity to do ministries in the background of the locations’ primary ministries (mainly in Osaka, where they had a performing gospel-choir). For instance, we made breakfast for the choir, interceded for them and expressed thankfulness and encouragement in many different ways. Going low for Jesus and putting others at the top has taught me valuable lessons on leadership and the value of background ministries.

What I would love to show you guys, is just how life was in Japan! Because trust me, it is a lot different than what I was used to. No I did not really have a culture-shock, but I did really have to get used to the culture.

So, yes I slept on the floor. In Tokyo I slept on a yogamat of 2 cm, in Osaka I slept in a traditional Japanese bed (4 cm thick). It was actually a lot better than I expected it to be. I’ve slept on worse matrasses. Every morning I would get up early, have some quiet time and would go and have breakfast. Japanese breakfast consists mostly of eggs, potato soup and some bread. But I also got blessed sometimes with french toast and pancakes because we lived on an international base. Those mornings were the best, I really love western breakfast.

I ate with chopsticks (eating with wood made eating much more fun for some reason) and slurping was normal. Yes, the culture is so different. I was lucky to be in a mixed community and not just be in a solely Japanese community, and as such being a foreigner didn’t make me feel pressured but I felt recognised and appreciated, even with the cultural mistakes that I made.

Sushi was great, and they have this amazing dish called Tapuyaki which is essentially just a deepfried doughball with octopus inside. SO GOOD. For everyone that longs to get some good Japanese food when they go to Japan: don’t try to find good food in Tokyo, it’s terrible compared to Osaka: the city’s whole culture is centered around food! You can imagine how David was in his little heaven right there.
One con though: their snacks are disappointing apart from their crazy candy. You gotta try those, they love their jelly’s.

It is difficult to explain how it is in Japan. So I would say, go and visit it. The people are amazing, they are so nice and hospitable, even though it is for the wrong reasons sometimes.

Japanese culture is so different from ours: from the countless ways to say ‘I am sorry’ and ‘thank you’, to the fact that you need to wear different flipflops in different rooms. One thing that was the weirdest to adjust to, is that they simply don’t have any trashcans on the street. And it is so clean!!! They just expect you to take your trash home and littering is dishonerable, so they don’t do that.

I am really thankful to have had this journey to Japan, and to have served in their churches and on the streets. To have had a taste of their culture, and to have met the people living there. Yeah, it was legendary.

I am back at Marine Reach, and am resting here after traveling for two weeks with two friends, crossing New Zealand. I am looking forward to spending Christmas and New Year’s with my New Zealand Whanau (family). God is preparing me for my trip back to The Netherlands, and I’ll be flying home on the eight of January (if everything goes well). It’s good to be seeing you guys again, everyone that reads this back home! And for all the others, the people I have had to say goodbye to in the last few weeks: I really hope you are doing well and I am so thankful for you!

It is weird to say goodbye to so many people and it is heartbreaking for many different reasons. But I am glad how it all went and I can see God moving so powerfully through the goodbyes.

Looking back to this DTS, I see such a powerful transformation for the better and I will end this year on a beautiful, positive note. Like many others, this Christmas may feel bittersweet. And that is okay. For me, looking back to 2019, I can see myself being in a much better place than I was before and I can see God’s perspective in so many of the valleys and rocky pathways that I tred. God is good. All the time. Even when life will never be the same as it used to be. He is faithful and trustworthy.

This may very well be the last ‘DTS BLOG’ that I’ll be writing, but don’t worry: I’ll keep blogging when I’m back. This journey is far from over and I will take you guys with me for as long as possible.

I want to end this post with the lyrics of an amazing song:

COME DOWN FROM THE STARS
SHOW YOUR HUMAN SCARS
TELL ME WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BELIEVE
THROUGH MY CHRIST HAUNTED THOUGHTS
THAT THE LOSSES YOU BOUGHT
ARE THE NIGHTS THAT YOU PEOPLED WITH YOUR DREAMS

WELL I’VE GOT NO ANSWERS, FOR HEARTBREAKS OR CANCERS
BUT A SAVIOR WHO SUFFERS THEM WITH ME
SINGING GOODBYE, OLYMPUS
THE HEART OF MY MAKER
IS SPREAD OUT ON THE ROAD, THE ROCKS AND THE WEEDS

john mark mcmillan

Merry Christmas, see you soon.

DUTCH

Mijn DTS tijd is voorbij. Ik ben geslaagd en ik kan eerlijk zeggen dat het zo’n fantastische, wilde rit was. Ik voel me gezegend wetende dat ik de keuze heb gemaakt voor een DTS, wat voor eeuwig mijn leven heeft verbeterd.

Ik wil jullie eerst even meenemen naar de tijd van mijn fantastische outreach. Waarschijnlijk post ik een aparte blogpost over de spirituele reis die ik heb doorgemaakt in Japan, wat op zichzelf al een fantastische ervaring was, dus ik zal dat gedeelte kort houden voor nu.
Tijdens de outreach hadden we de mogelijkheid om te dienen in Tokyo in de Little Ones’ Mission Nihonbashi Church (ja het is een lange naam vraag me niet waarom) en in Osaka bij YWAM Osaka (Blessing Church International (BCI)). We dienden daar met kinderwerk en werk met volwassenen, beiden waren gecentreerd rondom lessen Engels geven. Daarnaast hadden we de mogelijkheid om bedieningen te doen in de achtergrond van de locaties’ primaire bediendingen (grotendeels in Osaka, waar ze een gospel-koor hadden). We maakten bijvoorbeeld ontbijt voor het koor, deden intercessie voor hen en uitten dankbaarheid en bemoediging in vele verschillende manieren. Laag gaan voor Jezus en anderen op een hogere positie tillen heeft me vele waardevolle dingen geleerd over leiderschap en de waarde van achtergrond bediendingen.

Wat ik jullie heel graag zou willen laten zien, is hoe het leven in Japan eruit zag! Want, geloof mij, het is heel anders dan wat ik gewend was. En alhoewel er niet sprake was van een gignatische culture-shock, moest ik me wel echt even laten wennen.

Ja ik sliep op de vloet. In Tokyo sliep ik op een yogamatje van 2 cm en in Osaka sliep ik op een traditioneel Japans bed (4cm dik). Het was eerlijk gezegd een stuk beter dan ik had verwacht. Ik heb op slechtere bedden geslapen. Elke morgen werd ik vroeg wakker, had ik stille tijd en daarna ontbijt. Japans ontbijt bestaat voornamelijk uit eieren, aardappelsoep en brood. Maar ik werd ook gezegend met wentelteefjes en en Amerikaanse pannekoeken omdat we in op een internationale base verbleven. Die ochtenden waren het beste, ik hou echt van westers ontbijt.

Ik at met stokjes (blijkbaar is eten met hout veel leuker dan normaal bestek) en slurpen was normaal. Ja, de cultuur is echt anders. Ik had geluk dat ik in een gemixte community leefde en niet in een Japanse, hierdoor voelde ik me niet onder druk gezet als een buitenlander maar werd ik erkent en gewaardeerd, zelfde met de culturele fouten die ik maakte.

I ate with chopsticks (eating with wood made eating much more fun for some reason) and slurping was normal. Yes, the culture is so different. I was lucky to be in a mixed community and not just be in a solely Japanese community, and as such being a foreigner didn’t make me feel pressured but I felt recognised and appreciated, even with the cultural mistakes that I made.

De Sushi was fantastisch en ze hebben een super gerecht genaamd Tapuyaki, wat in essentie gefrituurd deeg is met octopus binnenin. ZO GOED. Voor iedereen die graag goed Japans voedsel wil wanneer ze naar Japan gaan: zoek niet voor goed eten in Tokyo, het is zoveel slechtre vergeleken met Osaka: de stadscultuur is gecentreerd rondom voedsel! Je kunt je voorstellen hoe David in z’n kleine hemel was daar. Een naadeel daarentegen: hun snacks zijn niet zo goed buiten hun rare snacks. Probeer de jelly’s, ze zijn gek op jelly’s.

Het is moelijk om uit te leggen hoe Japan is. Dus ik zou zeggen, ga het bezoeken. De mensen zijn fantastisch, zo aardig en uitnodigend, zelfs als het soms voor de verkeerde redenen is.

De Japanse cultuur is zo anders dan de onze: van de ontelbare manieren om ‘sorry’ en ‘dankjewel’ te zeggen, tot het feit dat je verschillende slippers moet dragen in verschillende ruimtes. Een ding wat super raar was om aan te passen is dat ze geen prullenbakken hebben op straat. En het is daar zo schoon!!! Ze verwachten gewoon dat je je afval meeneemt naar huis en afval opstraat gooien is slecht voor je eer dus dat doen ze niet.

Ik ben heel dankbaar dat ik deze reis naar Japan heb gehad en dat ik heb mogen dienen in hun kerken en op de straten. Dat ik de cultuur heb geproefd en dat ik de mensen heb ontmoet. Ja, het was legendarisch.

Ik ben terug op Marine Reach en ik ben hier aan het uitrusten na twee weken reizen met twee vrienden, cruisen door New Zealand. Ik kijk uit naar het vieren van kerst en nieuwjaar met mijn New Zealand’se Whanau (familie). God is me aan het voorbereiden voor mijn trip terug naar Nederland en als alles goed gaat zal ik terugvliegen op 8 Januari. Het is goed om jullie weer te zien, iedereen die dit leest thuis. En voor al de anderen, de mensen die ik gedag heb moeten zeggen in de laatste paar weken: ik hoop dat alles goed met jullie gaat en ik ben zo dankbaar voor jullie.

Het is raar om gedag te zeggen tegen zoveel mensen en het breekt mijn hart voor vele verschillende redenen. Maar ik ben blij met hoe alles is gegaan en ik zie God bewegen door al die wuifjes heen.

Terugkijkend op DTS zie ik zo’n gigantische, positieve transformatie en ik eindig dit jaar op een mooie, positieve noot. Net als vele anderen voelt deze kerst een beetje bitterzoet. En dat is oké. Voor mij, terugkijkend naar 2019, zie ik mezelf in een veel betere plek dan ik hiervoor was en ik zie God’s perspectief in zoveel dalen en ruige paden die ik heb bewandeld. God is goed. Altijd. Zelfs wanneer het leven niet meer hetzelfde zal zijn als het is geweest. Hij is trouw en geloofwaardig.

Dit zou wel eens de laatste ‘DTS BLOG’ zijn die ik schrijf, maar maak je geen zorgen: ik blijf bloggen wanneer ik weer terug ben. Deze reis is verre van voorbij en ik zal jullie meenemen in die reis voor zolang als mogelijk is.

Ik wil deze post eindigen met de lyrics van een fantastisch lied:

COME DOWN FROM THE STARS
SHOW YOUR HUMAN SCARS
TELL ME WHAT IT’S LIKE TO BELIEVE
THROUGH MY CHRIST HAUNTED THOUGHTS
THAT THE LOSSES YOU BOUGHT
ARE THE NIGHTS THAT YOU PEOPLED WITH YOUR DREAMS

WELL I’VE GOT NO ANSWERS, FOR HEARTBREAKS OR CANCERS
BUT A SAVIOR WHO SUFFERS THEM WITH ME
SINGING GOODBYE, OLYMPUS
THE HEART OF MY MAKER
IS SPREAD OUT ON THE ROAD, THE ROCKS AND THE WEEDS

john mark mcmillan

Gezegend kerstfeest.

4 thoughts on “DTS BLOG: Konnichiwa and Sayonara (EN/NL)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *